VIEW FOR YOU Hallberg-Rassy 57, a great future behind you

hallberg-rassy 57

The Hallberg-Rassy 57 embodies the history of the Swedish shipyard. Quality is top of mind, with some must-have classic elements, but also a look at what’s new

Dince 1943, on Orust Island in remote Ellos north of Göterborg, the Swedish shipyard Hallberg-Rassy has been building cruising boats for long-range sailing.

In a small community, which is struggling to exceed 1,000 people, today the Swedish brand continues to produce boats that, while remaining in the groove of tradition, have opened up to the evolutions of modern design, thanks in part to the signature of archistar German Frers, who combines the experience of the great designer with the critical eye of one who senses useful innovations. The Hallberg -Rassy 57 is a boat that fully represents the shipyard’s history: traditional under many elements, but with solutions that take into account changing times to complete a boat that still speaks a current language.

The pivotal concept around which the design of this 57-footer revolves is the central cockpit.

A cult element in the shipyard’s history, found on all early Hallberg models and still in high demand among fans of these boats today. A deep, highly sheltered central cockpit that takes advantage of the entire design of the deckhouse and the continuation of the paramare to provide guests with a completely dry, wave-proof area. In fact, water rising from the bow meets the design of the deckhouse, which diverts it aft and lets it drain away without disturbing, except in particularly rough seas, the volume of the cockpit.

At the stern of H.R. 57, note the large folding platform for access to the sea.

DECK AND “EASY” SOLUTIONS

While producing cruising boats Hallberg-Rassy has not, however, succumbed to the recent trend of absolute simplification of boat handling equipment.

Rather on the Hallbergs, and the 57 is no exception, there is everything you need to fine-tune the sails, with deck equipment cleverly placed to avoid annoying clutter.

To cite a few examples, we note that there is no mainsail carriage, but the fixed point that is responsible for its adjustment is positioned far aft, so that the sheet works at the leech for good control over the sail shape. Centrally located aft of the cockpit is a dedicated sail sheet winch.

The headsail winches, on the other hand, have been placed just outside the cockpit on a raised platform so that they can be operated while sitting near the rudder; they do not impede the space, but are in an ideal position to work the sheet properly.

The jib trolley has not been eliminated, but is placed close to the deckhouse: thus it improves the pull on the sail for better upwind angle, and at the same time does not hinder the passage to the bow. The sail plan, on the other hand, is decidedly modern, with strong vertical development, a generously sized mainsail, and a contained but not self-tacking jib.

The boat is thus designed to perform well in a wide range of conditions, not just in strong winds as befits northern boats. In fact, the powerful sail plan and a smoothly shaped hull with no edges allow the Hallberg-Rassy 57 to move well even in medium-light wind, while still remaining the performance that is typical of a cruising boat. But of a cruise that sails well, that wants to make its owner often and often forget the noise of the engine to give him only that of the wind on the sails and the water under the hull.

All in all, this 57 is a boat full of clever solutions simplify boat handling, but without losing their technical effectiveness. The concept of the Hallbergs in fact is: comfortable yes, but still a boat.

Highlights include the design of the deckhouse, which starts at the bow of the mast and then changes shape, becoming functional for cockpit protection.

TUPE AND DESIGN.

The design of the deckhouse is another of the peculiarities of this 57-footer. It begins at the bow of the mast, almost flush with the deck, and then increases in volume aft of the mast while still maintaining a harmonious shape that is well integrated with the deck line, without steps or angles. The decision to make it with large windows “slims” it down further, so that it looks like a natural element of the boat, in harmony with the overall design.

Otherwise German Frers has applied to the 57 the innovations also introduced on other models in the range recently: Double rudder, nearly straight bow with not excessively powerful volumes, dolphin bow, L-shaped keel with a small torpedo, more modern than past production, trying to combine the tradition of the unfashionable shipyard with some elements of necessary innovation to keep up with the times.

The dinette is positioned at the widest point of the boat, and thanks to moving the galley aft it gains additional space.

INTERIOR

Internally, the Hallberg-Rassy will make you feel at home. The volumes of the rest on this size have almost nothing to envy those of an apartment, may prove ideal for those who are looking for the boat of a lifetime to live aboard at all times.

The forward cabin, which can be considered as a second owner’s cabin.

The 57’s furniture, as well as that of the yard’s other models, is a concentration of quality craftsmanship with one-piece frames and continuous wood grain. Something that can only be achieved in a non-large-scale construction site.

Pictured is the “real” owner’s quarters, which is at the stern.

The interior offers spacious volumes due to the not inconsiderable freeboard. The forward cabin and starboard cabin are very large for the size of the yacht with plenty of storage space and generous bed size. The forward cabin is so comfortable that it is almost a second owner’s cabin. The aft cabin, the true owner’s cabin, is large, airy and with comfort worthy of a villa room. The kitchen has huge work areas and allows for an induction stove, dishwasher, microwave oven, and second freezer.

Interior woodwork is in traditional mahogany, polished European oak or teak. Such quality can hardly be found in an apartment. But only in the boat of life.

THE NUMBERS OF THEHALLBERG-RASSY 57

Length f. t.: 18.44 m
Gall. length: 16.77 m
Length. hull: 17.44 m
Maximum beam: 5.11 m
Pesc. max.: 2.43 m
Displacement: 28,000 kg
Sup. vel. 181 square meters
Engine: 175 hp
Serb. fuel: 1050 lt
Serb. water: 1030 lt
Project: Frers
Shipyard: Hallberg-Rassy
Standard version base price: 1,600,000 euros + VAT ex site
www.hallberg-rassy.it

COMPETITORS.

Contest 57 CS:
Length. f.t.: 17.23 m;
WIDTH: 5.12 m;
Sup. vel. 185 square meters
Displacement. 27,900 kg
base price: 1,369,000 euros + VAT ex site
www.nautigamma.com

Bordeaux 60:
Length. f.t.: 18.60 m;
WIDTH: 5.18 m;
Sup. vel. 170 sqm
Displacement. 26,700 kg
base price: n.d.
www.cnb.fr

Najad 570 CC:
Length. f.t.: 17.50 m;
Width: 5.05 m;
Sup. vel.: 163 sqm
Displacement. 26,000 kg
base price: 1,297,905 euros + VAT ex site
www.sailpassion.it

Mauro Giuffrè

 


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