PHOTOGALLERY The secret recipe for a super regatta

VSD2016@christophe_jouany-6544
With 60 boats at the start in its seventh edition, Les Voiles de Saint Barth (the great regatta open to all, from the smallest monohulls to superMaxi yachts, in the waters of the Caribbean island of Saint Barthelemy in the French Antilles) is confirmed as a must-see event of international sailing.
We will not tell you about results, but about the ingredients a regatta needs to become, precisely, great.

LES VOILES DE ST. BARTH – THE SHOTS OF CRISTOPHE JOUANY AND MICHAEL GRAMM

RECIPE FOR A SUCCESSFUL REGATTA
First of all, the festive and fun atmosphere that must accompany an event: at sea all adversaries, on land all friends. A true celebration of sailing is staged in St. Barth, with many side events reserved for crews. It is really about a vacation, moreover in a unique location. Then the opportunity, for all, to take part in the regatta. The lucky ones do it with their own boat, but a large proportion of the competitors are actually aboard charter boats. On the event’s website, one can actually get in touch with companies offering boardings on a wide variety of hulls, from the Swan 49 to the 77-foot maxitrimaran, from the large-scale production boat to the VOR 70. In addition, there is a special “seeking and offering boarding” section for shipowners and crews. Finally, boat for boat: year after year the number of “behemoths” involved has soared, from Comanche to Rambler, from Team Brunel to Maserati, from Phaedo 3 to SFS.

A FAR-FETCHED COMPARISON? MAYBE NO.
Let us indulge in a consideration. The above-mentioned ingredients look a lot like those of the VELA Cup (by the way: we expect you in Santa Margherita on Saturday, May 7): there is the beautiful Tigullio instead of Saint Barth. There are charters and seeking-off-boarding. There are Supernikka and The Moor of Venice in place of Comanche and Rambler. There is the same spirit of celebration.

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