Gorla Trophy, the chronicle from our correspondent

_MG_2748 the departureContrary to the tradition of the Gorla Trophy being a windy regatta, today Aeolus threw a tantrum and went to rest behind the clouds of Mount Baldo. A start without any particular excitement and with a dribble of Pélèr (the thermal wind from the north) saw the more than 120 boats present launch immediately to the Verona shore where the òra (the thermal from the south) was expected to arrive early.

_MG_642 preparationsLeading the way from the first moment were the catamaran multihulls up to 40′ that broke away from the fleet in a flash. The only one to chase the Cats, the free class Clandesteam, 15 crew of which as many as 13 hung from trapezes on the terraces.

For the protagonist of so many Centomiglias, this time there was nothing to be done: the 50th Gorla Trophy, the half-Centomiglia that has been increasingly successful for the past few years and has caught up with and surpassed the Centomiglia in the number of attendances, saw catamarans as the undisputed protagonists.

_MG_2759 new code 0 of one sailsVery fast, technical, spectacular with speeds that exceeded twenty knots with a real wind that never exceeded 15/16. Unfortunately, the time, which also came even earlier than the classic time, was also very light and dropped completely in the afternoon, leaving the small hulls soaking motionless in the middle of the lake.

_MG_2836 ufo 22 camillaOften upsetting the rankings as happened, for example, to the ufo 22 ITA 056 CAMILLA, which after being in the lead for most of the regatta saw three opponents slip by in the becalmed conditions, relegating it to the foot of the podium.

Text and images by Adriano Gatta

THE REAL TIME RANKING

THE ORC RANKINGS

THE “FIFTY-MILE” RANKING

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