Dramatic recovery of man overboard during Clipper Round The World Race


Dramatic video shows the recovery of a man overboard during the Clipper Round The World Race in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Andrew Taylor, a 46-year-old Londoner and member of the Derry-Lononderry-Doire crew, fell overboard and was rescued by fellow crew members. The weather conditions were quite bad: 35-knot winds. Andrew Taylor was changing a headsail with skipper Sean McCarter when he fell into the water. The skipper promptly returned to the helm and activated the MOB. Given the conditions, the man overboard was swept from the boat very quickly and eye contact was prevented by the swell. Andrew Taylor was in the water an hour and a half before being rescued and survived thanks to the dry suit he was wearing and his life jacket. After being recovered, he was examined by the ship’s doctor and is being kept under constant observation. ” MOB procedures were flawlessly implemented by the crew in difficult conditions thanks to the excellent preparation of the crew,” said Clipper Race founder and chairman Sir Robin Knox – Johnston.


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